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Volunteer

Volunteer for our Daffodil Campaign

This spring, volunteer for the Canadian Cancer Society Daffodil Campaign in your community. With the passion and support of our volunteers, no other cancer charity does what we do. We fund game-changing research into more than 100 types of cancer. We are proud to offer compassionate programs and support services – like our coast-to-coast, cancer information helpline – so no one has to face cancer alone. And we advocate to make healthy living a possibility for everyone.

For the nearly 1 in 2 Canadians expected to be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, we’re here to help. Volunteer and be a part of our collective that continues to change lives for the better. Together, we prove that life is bigger than cancer.

Find local volunteer opportunities 

From selling daffodil flowers and pins to fundraising in your community, there are many ways you can get involved during this year’s Daffodil Campaign throughout the province!

How you can help:
  • Sell fresh daffodils in your community – April 2-13, 2020
  • Deliver fresh daffodils – April 2-13, 2020
  • Deliver and pick up pin boxes – April

For more information about volunteer opportunities in Winnipeg, CLICK HERE or email volunteer@mb.cancer.ca.

For more information about volunteer opportunities in Brandon and rural Manitoba, email daffodil@mb.cancer.ca.

Interested in coordinating orders of fresh daffodils at your workplace? For more information and/or to order daffodils online, CLICK HERE. Deadline to order flowers is March 13, 2020.

Canvass your community:
  • Join our Door-to-Door Canvassing team as a Canvasser, Poll Captain or Area Chair – April 1-30

To learn more about these volunteer opportunities, contact Jana Pringle at 204-789-0881 or jpringle@mb.cancer.ca.

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