Multiple myeloma

You are here: 

Spread of multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is usually widespread by the time it is diagnosed. It affects multiple (more than 1) bones or multiple areas of a bone.

The most common bones where multiple myeloma occurs include:

  • spine (vertebrae)
  • ribs
  • breastbone (sternum)
  • hips
  • shoulder blade (scapula)
  • skull
  • upper arm bone (humerus)
  • upper leg bone (femur)

Doctors measure substances in the blood or urine to see if the disease is progressing, or getting worse. This includes measuring levels of:

  • hemoglobin
  • calcium
  • monoclonal protein (M-protein)
  • creatinine
  • beta-2-microglobulin

Stories

Dr Shawn Li I’m extremely grateful to the Canadian Cancer Society for funding my research with an Innovation Grant.

Read more

What’s the lifetime risk of getting cancer?

Icon - 1 in 2

The latest Canadian Cancer Statistics report shows about half of Canadians are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime.

Learn more