Leukemia

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Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer that starts in blood stem cells. Stem cells are basic cells that develop into different types of cells that have different jobs.

As the stem cells of the blood develop, they become blast cells (blasts), which are immature blood cells. In leukemia, there is an overproduction of blast cells. These blast cells develop abnormally and don’t develop into mature blood cells. Over time, the blast cells crowd out normal blood cells so that they can’t do their jobs. When leukemia is diagnosed, these blast cells may be called leukemia cells.

Acute myelogenous leukemia is also called acute myeloid leukemia, acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia or acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL).

AML starts in abnormal myeloid stem cells. It is called acute because it develops quickly.

AML is one of the more common types of leukemia in adults. It is less common in children.

Find out more about AML.

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