Références

Information sur le cancer / Types de cancer / Information générale sur le cancer - Enfant / Survie à long terme / Émotions

American Cancer Society. (2014, July 2). When Your Child's Treatment Ends: A Guide for Families Adjusting to Normal Life After Treatment. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc.

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). (2013, November). Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Cancer. Alexandria, VA.: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). (2015, August). Coping with Fear of Recurrence. Alexandria, VA.: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Barakat, L.P., Alderfer, M.A., and Kazak, A.E. Posttraumatic growth in adolescent survivors of cancer and their mothers and fathers. Society of Pediatric Psychology. (2006, May). Journal of Pediatric Psychology. Cary, North Carolina: Oxford University Press. 31(4):413-419.

CureSearch. (2008, October). Emotional Issues after Childhood Cancer. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. What Makes It Likely That Someone Will Experience Positive Growth. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Helping My Child Find Personal Growth. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Exploring the Idea of Personal Growth. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Can Something Good Come From This?. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Emotional Health After Childhood Cancer. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

End of treatment and beyond. Janes-Hodder, H. & Keene, N. (2002). Childhood Cancer - A Parent's Guide to Solid Tumor Cancers. (2nd Édition). O'Reilly. 25: 422-438.

Keene N, Hobbie W, Ruccione K. (2012). Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Practical Guide to Your Future. (3rd Édition). Bellingham, WA: Childhood Cancer Guides.

Lown, E.A., Goldsby, R., Mertens, A.C., et al. Alcohol consumption patterns and risk factors among childhood cancer survivors compared to siblings and general population peers. (2008, July). Addiction. Abingdon, England: Wiley-Blackwell. 103(7):1139-48.

Maunsell, E., Pogany, L., Barrera, M., et al. Quality of life among long-term adolescent and adult survivors of childhood cancer. (2006, June 1). Journal of Clinical Oncology. American Society of Clinical Oncology. 24(16):2527-2535.

National Cancer Institute. (2015, 11/13). Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®). Extrait de: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq.

National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group. (2006). Health Link: Emotional Issues after Childhood Cancer. Bethesda, MD.

National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group. Beyond the Cure: Emotional Issues. St. Louis, MO.

National Children's Cancer Society. Emotional.

Ness, K.K. and Gurney, J.G. Adverse late effects of childhood cancer and its treatment on health and performance. (2007, April). Annual Review of Public Health. Palo Alto, CA: Annual Reviews Inc. 28:279-302.

Schultz, K.A.P., Ness, K.K., Whitton, J., et al. Behavioral and social outcomes in adolescent survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study. (2007, August 27). Journal of Clinical Oncology. 25(24):3649-56.

Wignberg-Williams, R.J., Kamps, W.A., and Hoekstra-Weebers, J.W.H.M. Psychological adjustment of parents of pediatric cancer patients revisited: five years later. (2005, May 3). Psycho-Oncology. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 15: 1-8.

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