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Personnel support awards evaluation

CCSRI conducted a retrospective evaluation of its Personnel Support Awards (training awards) program. The intent was to assess the outcomes, impacts and benefits of training awards administered from 1994 – 2007. Survey methodology was employed and online questionnaires were administered to successful applicants and unsuccessful applicants from 1994 – 2007 as well as grant competition funded trainees (post-doctoral and clinical research fellows funded by their supervisor’s research grant) from 2004 – 2007. The intent was to measure and compare respondents’ perceived program value, career trajectory, and performance.

This project provided insight into the long-term effects of the CCSRI’s training awards program. Overall, it showed that there are relatively few differences in the career trajectory, career performance, and perceived program value of successful applicants, unsuccessful applicants and grant competition funded trainees. This information is now being used to inform CCSRI decisions regarding future program design. Moreover, the evaluation design and key findings have been shared with the health research community through a presentation at the October, 2010 meeting of the Forum of Health Research Funders.

 

Key findings:

  • The majority of respondents, regardless of having received a training award or not, are currently working as cancer researchers.
  • The majority of respondents, regardless of having received a training award or not, report a similar career field, patent record, influence on clinical guidelines, receipt and type of research funding, level of job satisfaction, and perceived contribution to the eradication of cancer and/or the enhancement of the quality of life of people living with cancer.
  • Trainees supported by CCS personnel awards advanced to become independent researchers at a faster rate than unsuccessful applicants without a training award.
  • Trainees supported by CCS personnel awards have a higher publication count (total number of publications) than both unsuccessful applicants without a training award and grant competition funded trainees (post-doctoral and clinical research fellows funded by their supervisor’s research grant).
  • The majority of respondents, regardless of having received a training award or not, appreciate the value of training awards as a mechanism by which to encourage trainees to pursue a career in cancer research and to build cancer research capacity, but are less certain about the value of funding training awards if it comes at the expense of research grants.

Last modified on: February 26, 2016