References

Cancer information / Cancer types / Childhood cancer information / After treatment

American Cancer Society. (2014, July 2). When Your Child's Treatment Ends: A Guide for Families Adjusting to Normal Life After Treatment. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc.

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). People Living with Cancer: Survivorship. Alexandria, VA.: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

CureSearch. The first month off treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Two to Six Months Off Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Six to Twelve Months Off Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. One Year Off Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Transitioning to Adult Care. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

CureSearch. Long-Term Follow-Up Care. Bethesda, MD: National Childhood Cancer Foundation & Children's Oncology Group.

End of treatment and beyond. Janes-Hodder, H. & Keene, N. (2002). Childhood Cancer - A Parent's Guide to Solid Tumor Cancers. (2nd Edition). O'Reilly. 25: 422-438.

Keene N, Hobbie W, Ruccione K. (2012). Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Practical Guide to Your Future. (3rd Edition). Bellingham, WA: Childhood Cancer Guides.

National Cancer Institute. (2001, January). Young People with Cancer: A Handbook for Parents.

National Children's Cancer Society. Medical.

Shaw, A.K., Pogany, L., Speechley, K.N., et al. Use of health care services by survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer in Canada. (2006, April 15). Cancer. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 106:1829-37.

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