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Nutrition and fitness

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We wish we could tell you that preventing cancer was as simple as eating a certain food or doing a certain exercise, but we can’t. This much, though, is clear:

  • You have a higher risk of developing cancer if you are overweight. Staying at a healthy body weight reduces your risk of cancer.
  • Eating well – lots of veggies and fruit, lots of fibre, and little fat and sugar – will help you keep a healthy body weight.
  • Regular physical activity helps protect against cancer. It’s also one of the best ways to help you stay at a healthy body weight, which reduces your risk of cancer.
  • Red meat and processed meat increase your risk of cancer.
Food for thought

About one-third of all cancers can be prevented by eating well, being active and maintaining a healthy body weight.

The science is clear: it’s the overall pattern of living that’s important. You can lower your risk if you move more, stay lean and eat plenty of vegetables and fruit, as well as other plant foods such as whole grains and beans.

Public Health Nutritionists
In Saskatchewan, we work with Public Health Nutritionists and in motion to promote the benefits of healthy eating and physical activity.

Public Health Nutritionists of Saskatchewan are part of a population health promotion team. They work with a variety of community partners (at the local, provincial and national level) to help residents make healthy food choices, to develop nutrition standards and healthy public policy for the primary prevention of illness.

Saskatchewan in motion
Saskatchewan in motion is a province-wide movement aimed at increasing physical activity to make Saskatchewan people the healthiest, most physically active in Canada.

Stay informed at www.healthychoicesforlife.ca

Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter, Fight for life, and check out our recipe of the month.

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