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Indoor tanning

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, but it’s also one of the most preventable. Exposure to UV rays – whether from the sun’s rays, tanning beds or sun lamps – increases the risk for non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. There is no safe way to get a tan. To reduce your risk of getting skin cancer, do not use artificial tanning equipment such as tanning beds or sun lamps.

More on indoor tanning

  • Our position

    The Society is committed to protecting Canadians from the harms of indoor tanning.

    • People under the age of 18 must not be allowed by law to use indoor tanning equipment.
    • Indoor tanning advertising aimed at people under the age of 18 must be banned.
    • Indoor tanning regulations must require UV-emitting devices to be registered, staff to be licensed, and equipment and premises to be inspected regularly.
    • UV-emitting devices must be labelled in a way that clearly explains the health risks.
    • The indoor tanning industry must stop using misleading phrases such as safe, no harmful rays, no adverse effects or similar wording.

The Canadian Cancer Society - Newfoundland and Labrador Division continues to work with our National body to promote the need for restrictions on indoor tanning and to follow up on our provincial advocacy campaign conducted in 2012-2013.  Recommendations were made to the Minister of Health and Community Services to enact new legislation on indoor tanning, and the Personal Services Act (Bill 27) received Royal Assent on June 27, 2012.  That part of the act which pertains to artificial tanning came into force on January 28, 2014. The legislation prohibits persons under 19 years of age from artificial UV tanning in public salons.

We are maintaining our campaign of public education – developing education tools and materials and delivering awareness sessions. Concentration and focus continues to be on raising public awareness on the negative effects of artificial UV tanning, as well as on risks associated with occupational and environmental UV exposure.



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