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Husky Energy Healing Garden

The Husky Energy Healing Garden at Daffodil Place offers a peaceful and comforting sanctuary for cancer patients and their families. It features walkways, a pond, a gazebo, numerous plants and shrubs, quiet sitting areas, and a vegetable garden for the guests of Daffodil Place. The perimeter of the space is enclosed by a privacy fence and is surrounded by oak trees to enhance the appearance and reduce noise.

Medical research tells us that people who have access to psychological supportive environments, such as healing gardens, often experience improved clinical outcomes. Our healing garden helps improve the quality of life for those who stay at Daffodil Place.

Daffodil Place guest, Selby, fed the fish almost every day during his stay at Daffodil Place because he said it helped to clear his mind and brought him happiness.

“The Husky Energy Healing Garden is an absolutely beautiful place. I’ve seen goldfish before, but nothing as beautiful as what’s in this pond. When I look at the fish, I truly forget that I have cancer. I forget, even if it’s just for a minute or two, because the fish are so beautiful. A healing garden is certainly the right name for this place, because when you walk in here you forget all about your treatments, all about your cancer, and all about what problems you are facing.”
                                                                                   - Selby Stuckless, Labrador City

  • Donor naming opportunities

    Naming opportunities are still available. For further information, please contact:

    Al Pelley
    Director of Revenue Development
    Canadian Cancer Society, NL Division
    Email: apelley@nl.cancer.ca
    Toll-free: 1-888-753-6520, ext. 220
    Telephone: 709-753-6522

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Stories

Rebecca and James Hamm It was very important that the fundraiser be in honour of my uncle, because it’s a great way to show our support for him.

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Making progress in the cancer fight

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The 5-year cancer survival rate has increased from 25% in the 1940s to 60% today.

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