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Parathyroid cancer

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Supportive care for parathyroid cancer

Supportive careSupportive careTreatment given to improve the quality of life of people who have a serious illness (such as cancer). helps people meet the physical, practical, emotional and spiritual challenges of parathyroid cancer. It is an important part of cancer care. There are many programs and services available to help meet the needs and improve the quality of life of people living with cancer and their loved ones, especially after treatment has ended.

 

Recovering from parathyroid cancer and adjusting to life after treatment is different for each person, depending on the extent of the disease, the type of treatment and many other factors. The end of cancer treatment may bring mixed emotions. Even though treatment has ended, there may be other issues to deal with, such as coping with long-term side effects. A person who has been treated for parathyroid cancer may have the following concerns.

Hypercalcemia

Hypercalcemia that occurs as a result of parathyroid cancer is caused by the tumour producing too much parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH controls the calcium level in the blood. The symptoms and related health problems of parathyroid cancer are almost always caused by increased calcium levels. Medicines are given to control hypercalcemia.

Vocal cord paralysis

Vocal cord paralysis is a complication of surgery that occurs if the recurrent laryngeal nerve is damaged or removed.

  • Signs and symptoms of vocal cord paralysis may include:
    • hoarseness
    • changes in voice quality
    • discomfort from vocal straining
  • Treatment options for vocal cord paralysis may include:
    • A speech-language pathologist can provide speech therapy and exercises to improve the quality of the voice.
    • Injections into the paralyzed vocal cord may help to relieve hoarseness and improve voice quality.

See a list of questions to ask your doctor about supportive care after treatment.

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