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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma

Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTL or HSTCL) is a rare T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). It tends to occur more often in teenage boys and young adult men. It sometimes develops in people with a suppressed immune system, such as after an organ transplant. It may also be called hepatosplenic gamma delta T-cell lymphoma.

HSTL is often difficult to diagnose. HSTL usually involves the liver or spleen. As a result, people with HSTL often have an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly), an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) or both (hepatosplenomegaly). The bone marrow is also commonly involved. HSTL is associated with symptoms like fatigue, B symptoms, anemia and abnormally low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia). Lymph nodes are not usually enlarged.

HSTL is a very fast-growing (aggressive) lymphoma. The prognosis for people with this type of lymphoma is often poor.


There is no standard treatment for HSTL.


Most often, people with HSTL are treated with combination chemotherapy. CHOP or CHOP-like therapies are used.

  • CHOP – cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Procytox), doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine (Oncovin) and prednisone (Deltasone)

Although most people respond to chemotherapy at first, many will relapse.

Stem cell transplant

A stem cell transplant (SCT) may be an option for some people with HSTL.

For more detailed information on specific drugs, go to sources of drug information.


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