Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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If childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma spreads

Cancer cells can spread from the lymph nodes to other parts of the body. This is called metastasis. Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your child’s healthcare team plan treatment and future care.

Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) doesn’t usually spread in a predictable way. It can spread to almost any tissue or organ in the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream.

The most common sites where childhood NHL spreads are:

  • lymph nodes close to where the cancer started
  • lymph nodes in other parts of the body
  • the spleen
  • the liver
  • organs in the gastrointestinal tract, such as the stomach and intestine
  • a lung, both lungs or the tissue that covers the lungs and lines the chest cavity (called the pleura)
  • the brain
  • the skin

Stories

Paulette Hicks A random act of kindness during one of the most vulnerable times in someone’s life can be powerful.

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Facing the financial burden of cancer

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The Canadian Cancer Society provides helpful information about government income programs, financial resources and other resources available to families struggling to make sense of the personal financial burden they face.

Learn more