Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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If childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma spreads

Cancer cells can spread from the lymph nodes to other parts of the body. This is called metastasis. Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your child’s healthcare team plan treatment and future care.

Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) doesn’t usually spread in a predictable way. It can spread to almost any tissue or organ in the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream.

The most common sites where childhood NHL spreads are:

  • lymph nodes close to where the cancer started
  • lymph nodes in other parts of the body
  • the spleen
  • the liver
  • organs in the gastrointestinal tract, such as the stomach and intestine
  • a lung, both lungs or the tissue that covers the lungs and lines the chest cavity (called the pleura)
  • the brain
  • the skin

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