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Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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If childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma spreads

Cancer cells can spread from the lymph nodes to other parts of the body. This is called metastasis. Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your child’s healthcare team plan treatment and future care.

Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) doesn’t usually spread in a predictable way. It can spread to almost any tissue or organ in the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream.

The most common sites where childhood NHL spreads are:

  • lymph nodes close to where the cancer started
  • lymph nodes in other parts of the body
  • the spleen
  • the liver
  • organs in the gastrointestinal tract, such as the stomach and intestine
  • a lung, both lungs or the tissue that covers the lungs and lines the chest cavity (called the pleura)
  • the brain
  • the skin


Dr Marc Therrien Dr Marc Therrien is working toward blocking a cancer-driving protein.

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Clinical trial discovery improves quality of life

Illustration of test tubes

A clinical trial led by the Society’s NCIC Clinical Trials group found that men with prostate cancer who are treated with intermittent courses of hormone therapy live as long as those receiving continuous therapy.

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