Neuroendocrine
tumours

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If neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) spread

Cancer cells can spread from the organ where they started to other parts of the body. This spread is called metastasis.

Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your healthcare team plan your treatment and future care. If a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) spreads, it can spread to the following:

  • tissues or structures near the organ where the cancer started, such as the peritoneum, the pleura or fat tissue
  • lymph nodes around where the cancer started (regional lymph nodes)
  • liver
  • lungs
  • pancreas
  • bone

peritoneum

The membrane that lines the walls of the abdomen and pelvis (parietal peritoneum), and covers and supports most of the abdominal organs (visceral peritoneum).

pleura

The thin layer of tissue that covers the lungs and lines the chest cavity. It protects and cushions the lungs and produces a fluid that acts like a lubricant so the lungs can move smoothly in the chest cavity.

Stories

Paul Newcombe Volunteering during Daffodil Month is an incredibly rewarding experience, whether you have been touched by cancer or not.

Read Paul's story

Great progress has been made

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Some cancers, such as thyroid and testicular, have survival rates of over 90%. Other cancers, such as pancreatic, brain and esophageal, continue to have very low survival rates.

Learn more