Lung cancer

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If non–small cell lung cancer spreads

Non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells have the potential to spread from the lung to other parts of the body where they can grow into new tumours. This process is called metastasis. The tumours are also called metastasis (singular) or metastases (plural). Metastases are also called secondary tumours.

Understanding the usual progression of cancer helps the doctor to predict its probable course, plan treatment and anticipate further care.

The most common sites where non–small cell lung cancer spreads are:

Cancer-related emergencies are serious cancer-related problems that can occur because of non–small cell lung cancer.

pleural cavity

The space between the lungs and the walls of the chest that is lined by the pleura.

adrenal gland

A small gland on top of each kidney that produces a variety of hormones involved in different body functions, including metabolism (the chemical processes needed for cell function, growth and reproduction), heart rate, blood pressure and controlling blood sugar levels.

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