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Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma

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Stem cell transplant for childhood Hodgkin lymphoma

Some children with primary progressive (also called resistant) or recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cancer will be offered a stem cell transplant. Stem cells are found in the bone marrow, the bloodstream and the umbilical cord. They are basic cells that develop into different types of cells that have different jobs. For example, all our blood cells develop from blood stem cells.

A stem cell transplant is used to replace stem cells when stem cells or bone marrow are damaged. They can be damaged by disease or destroyed by high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Types of transplants used for childhood HL

The following types of stem cell transplant may be used with childhood HL.


Autologous transplants are used to treat primary progressive or recurrent childhood HL. In this type of transplant, the stem cells are taken from the child’s own bone marrow or blood.

Before the stem cells are collected, the doctor will do bone marrow aspiration and biopsy to make sure that there are no cancer cells in the bone marrow.


Allogeneic transplants are being used as an experimental treatment for primary progressive or recurrent childhood HL. In this type of transplant, the stem cells are taken from one person (the donor) and are given to the child receiving the transplant (the recipient). The donor may be a relative or may be unrelated to the child.

The donor and recipient are matched through a process called human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing. Find out more about HLA typing.

Questions to ask about stem cell transplant

Find out more about stem cell transplant. To make the decisions that are right for your child, ask your healthcare team questions about stem cell transplant.


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