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Laser surgery for eye cancer

Laser surgery (also called laser photocoagulation) uses an intense, narrow beam of light (called a laser beam). Laser surgery is not one of the primary treatments for eye cancer. It is not used to treat ocular lymphoma. It is occasionally used to treat intraocular melanoma:

  • after radiation therapy to destroy cancer cells left behind and to reduce the risk of the cancer recurring (adjuvantadjuvantTreatment given in addition to the first-line therapy (the first or standard treatment) to help reduce the risk of a disease (such as cancer) coming back (recurring). therapy)
  • that has recurred

Laser surgery may also be used to treat side effects of prior radiation therapy to the eye.

Laser surgery is usually done under local anaestheticanaestheticA drug that causes anesthesia (the loss of some or all feeling or awareness).. Several treatments may be needed.

Transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) is similar to laser surgery. It uses an infrared light that produces heat to destroy cells. TTT is only used as an adjuvant therapy. Usually 1–3 treatments are needed. TTT is less likely to damage the retina than laser surgery.

See a list of questions to ask your doctor about laser surgery.


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