Eye cancer

You are here: 

Survival statistics for eye cancer

Survival statistics for eye cancer are very general estimates and must be interpreted very carefully. Because these statistics are based on the experience of groups of people, they cannot be used to predict a particular person’s chances of survival.

There are many different ways to measure and report cancer survival statistics. Your doctor can explain the statistics for eye cancer and what they mean to you.

Relative survival

Relative survival looks at how likely people with cancer are to survive after their diagnosis compared to people in the general population who do not have cancer but who share similar characteristics (such as age and sex).

In Canada, the 5-year relative survival for eye cancer is 77%. This means that, on average, people diagnosed with eye cancer are 77% as likely to live at least 5 years after their diagnosis as people in the general population.

Survival of intraocular melanoma by stage

Survival varies with the stage of intraocular melanoma. Intraocular melanoma tends to grow slowly. Generally, the earlier it is diagnosed and treated, the better the outcome.

Intraocular melanoma is often very responsive to treatment. There are many effective treatments available for intraocular melanoma.

There are no specific Canadian statistics available for the different stages and location of intraocular melanoma. The following information comes from a variety of sources. It may include statistics from other countries that are likely to have similar outcomes as in Canada.

The 10-year survival rate is the percentage of people who are alive at least 10 years after their cancer diagnosis. But people with this type of cancer may live much longer than 10 years.

Intraocular melanoma survival by stage
Stage10-year survival

I

88%

IIA

80%

IIB

68%

IIIA

45%

IIIB

26%

IIIC

21%

IV

0%

For people with metastatic disease, the median survival is 4.5–17 months. Median survival is the period of time (usually months or years) at which half of the people with cancer are still alive. The other half will live less than this amount of time.

Questions about survival

Talk to your doctor about your prognosis. A prognosis depends on many factors, including:

  • your health history
  • the type of cancer
  • the stage
  • certain characteristics of the cancer
  • the treatments chosen
  • how the cancer responds to treatment

Only a doctor familiar with these factors can put all of this information together with survival statistics to arrive at a prognosis.

Stories

Researcher Dr Michael Taylor Dr Michael Taylor is revealing genetic changes in childhood brain cancer.

Learn more

Reducing the burden of cancer

Icon - hand with dollar sign floating above it

Canadians can help CCS fund the best research and support people living with cancer by donating and volunteering.

Learn more