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Esophageal cancer

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If esophageal cancer spreads

Cancer cells can spread from the esophagus to other parts of the body and develop into a new tumour. The new tumour is called a metastasis or secondary tumour.

Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your healthcare team plan your treatment and future care. If esophageal cancer spreads, it is most likely to spread to the following:

  • lymph nodes near the esophagus
  • lymph nodes in the neck or upper chest
  • lymph nodes in the lower chest or around the stomach
  • celiac lymph nodes in the abdomen
  • windpipe, or trachea (sometimes causes an abnormal opening, or fistula, from the esophagus to the trachea)
  • vocal chords
  • aorta
  • pericardium
  • liver
  • lung
  • stomach
  • bone
  • adrenal glands
  • kidneys
  • brain


Woman at market in front of CCS poster This truly is a life-saving program, and we are so grateful to Husky Energy for making it happen.

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Providing rides to cancer treatment

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For more than 50 years, the Canadian Cancer Society’s transportation program has enabled patients to focus their energy on fighting cancer and not on worrying about how they will get to treatment.

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