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Esophageal cancer

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If esophageal cancer spreads

Cancer cells can spread from the esophagus to other parts of the body and develop into a new tumour. The new tumour is called a metastasis or secondary tumour.

Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your healthcare team plan your treatment and future care. If esophageal cancer spreads, it is most likely to spread to the following:

  • lymph nodes near the esophagus
  • lymph nodes in the neck or upper chest
  • lymph nodes in the lower chest or around the stomach
  • celiac lymph nodes in the abdomen
  • windpipe, or trachea (sometimes causes an abnormal opening, or fistula, from the esophagus to the trachea)
  • vocal chords
  • aorta
  • pericardium
  • liver
  • lung
  • stomach
  • bone
  • adrenal glands
  • kidneys
  • brain


Stephanie Hermsen Thanks to the incredible progress in retinoblastoma research made possible by Canadian Cancer Society funding, my son won’t have to go through what I did.

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Help for smokers trying to quit

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It’s okay to need help to quit smoking. The Canadian Cancer Society is here to support people who are ready to quit and even those people who aren’t ready.

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