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Esophageal cancer

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If esophageal cancer spreads

Cancer cells can spread from the esophagus to other parts of the body and develop into a new tumour. The new tumour is called a metastasis or secondary tumour.

Understanding how a type of cancer usually grows and spreads helps your healthcare team plan your treatment and future care. If esophageal cancer spreads, it is most likely to spread to the following:

  • lymph nodes near the esophagus
  • lymph nodes in the neck or upper chest
  • lymph nodes in the lower chest or around the stomach
  • celiac lymph nodes in the abdomen
  • windpipe, or trachea (sometimes causes an abnormal opening, or fistula, from the esophagus to the trachea)
  • vocal chords
  • aorta
  • pericardium
  • liver
  • lung
  • stomach
  • bone
  • adrenal glands
  • kidneys
  • brain


Steve Manske Helping young people improve their health

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Support from someone who has ‘been there’

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The Canadian Cancer Society’s peer support program is a telephone support service that matches cancer patients and their caregivers with specially trained volunteers.

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