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Breast cancer

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Intraductal papilloma

An intraductal papilloma is a benign wart-like tumour found in the milk ducts of the breast. It is usually found in the area close to the nipple.

Most intraductal papillomas occur as single tumours in one breast. Having a single intraductal papilloma does not increase a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer, unless there are additional changes to the cells, such as atypical hyperplasia of the breast.

Multiple papillomas are usually found deeper in the breast, further from the nipple. Multiple papillomas may also occur in both breasts. Having multiple papillomas may increase a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer.

Signs and symptoms

The signs and symptoms an intraductal papilloma may include:

  • nipple discharge – clear or bloody
  • pain
  • a lump that can be felt near the nipple

Multiple papillomas may not cause any symptoms.


If the signs and symptoms of an intraductal papilloma are present, or if the doctor suspects an intraductal papilloma, tests will be done to make a diagnosis. Tests may include:


Treatment options for intraductal papilloma may include surgery to remove the papilloma and part of the duct surrounding the tumour.


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