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Prognosis and survival for childhood Ewing sarcoma of the bone

The following are prognostic and predictive factors for childhood Ewing sarcoma of the bone.

If the cancer has spread

Metastasis is when cancer spreads from where it started to another part of the body. Whether or not the cancer has already spread when it is first diagnosed is one of the most important prognostic factors for childhood Ewing sarcoma of the bone. Metastasis is linked with a poorer prognosis.

Children with Ewing sarcoma that has only spread to a lung have a more favourable prognosis than those with metastasis to other parts of the body. In general, the more sites of disease there are, the worse the prognosis.

Location of the tumour

Doctors are not entirely sure why, but Ewing sarcoma of the pelvis has the worst prognosis compared to other parts of the body. This could be because of larger size, central location or the specific biology of the disease itself.

Tumour size

Children with smaller tumours tend to have better outcomes. Children with larger tumours (greater than 8 cm) tend to have a poorer prognosis.

Age

Children who are younger than 18 when they are diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma of the bone tend to have a better prognosis than older teenagers or young adults.

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