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Prognosis and survival for childhood bone cancer

You may have questions about prognosis for childhood bone cancer. A prognosis is the doctor’s best estimate of how cancer will affect a child and how it will respond to treatment. Prognosis and survival depend on many factors. Only a doctor familiar with a child’s medical history, type of cancer, stage, characteristics of the cancer, the treatments chosen and the response to treatment can put all of this information together with survival statistics to arrive at a prognosis.

A prognostic factor is an aspect of the cancer or a characteristic of the child that the doctor will consider when making a prognosis. A predictive factor influences how a cancer will respond to a certain treatment. Prognostic and predictive factors are often discussed together. They both play a part in deciding on a treatment plan and a prognosis.

There are different prognostic and predictive factors for osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma of the bone. There are also separate survival statistics for each type of cancer.


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