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If you don’t want to talk about your feelings

While talking about your cancer diagnosis is important, you may just not want to talk. For you, the best way to cope may be to stay busy and focused and just get on with day-to-day tasks. Trying to talk about feelings may add more stress when your energy is better used for dealing with cancer treatments.

If you feel this way, you can ask people to respect your wishes. You might say:

  • “I’m finding it easier to cope by just getting on with life and focusing on being healthy during my cancer treatments.”
  • “Thanks, I understand that you’re concerned about me. I appreciate it and I’ll let you know when I’m ready to talk.”

You may decide that you don’t want to share your feelings with every person who asks. With casual friends or co-workers, it may be easier and more comfortable for you just to say a few words without getting into any details. When they ask about how you are feeling, you can give a brief but honest answer.

  • “I had a bad day yesterday, but I’m feeling better today. Thank you for asking.”
  • “I’m doing well, thank you. I appreciate your concern.”

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