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Canadian Cancer Statistics publication

The 2016 edition will be available in the fall. To receive notification of its release, please email stats@cancer.ca.


Canadian Cancer Statistics 2015

This annual publication provides health professionals, researchers, policy-makers and the general public with detailed information about incidence, mortality and other statistics for the most common types of cancer by age, sex, year and province or territory. It is developed through collaboration between the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries with input from the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee.

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Media release 2015

  • 2015 cancer statistics – figures in PowerPoint
  • National statistics at a glance from Canadian Cancer Statistics
    • An estimated 196,900 new cases of cancer and 78,000 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2015.
    • More than half (about 51%) of all new cases will be prostate, breast, lung and colorectal cancers.
    • About 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes and 1 in 4 will die of the disease.
    • 63% of Canadians diagnosed with cancer will survive at least 5 years after their diagnosis.
    • At the beginning of 2009, there were about 810,045 Canadians living with a cancer that had been diagnosed in the previous 10 years.
  • British Columbia statistics at a glance from Canadian Cancer Statistics
    Overview of new cases and deaths

    An estimated 196,900 new cases of cancer and 78,000 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2015. Prostate, lung, breast, and colorectal cancer account for the top 4 newly diagnosed cancers.

    In 2015, an estimated 10,100 people will die of cancer in British Columbia, and 25,400 new cases will be diagnosed.

    Cancer statistics for men in British Columbia

    For men in British Columbia, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2015:

    • An estimated 3,800 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.
    • An estimated 1,750 men will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
    • An estimated 1,550 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer.

    For men in British Columbia, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2015:

    • An estimated 1,250 men will die of lung cancer.
    • An estimated 670 men will die of colorectal cancer.
    • An estimated 600 men will die of prostate cancer.
    Cancer statistics for women in British Columbia

    For women in British Columbia, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer. In 2015:

    • An estimated 3,400 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
    • An estimated 1,600 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer.
    • An estimated 1,400 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

    For women in British Columbia, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. In 2015:

    • An estimated 1,250 women will die of lung cancer.
    • An estimated 610 women will die of breast cancer.
    • An estimated 560 women will die of colorectal cancer.
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    The above figures are taken from Canadian Cancer Statistics 2015. These statistics are prepared through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries.


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