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Dr Laurence Klotz

O. Harold Warwick Prize recipient in 2014

Dr Laurence KlotzDr Klotz is a leading urologic cancer surgeon and research investigator in Canada and worldwide. He is highly regarded by his colleagues and collaborators for his transformative contributions to evidence-based treatment standards for prostate cancer.

Dr Klotz is best known for his role in championing the Delayed Selective Intervention standard for prostate cancer treatment. This conservative approach recommends monitoring only for men with low risk of developing aggressive cancer and offering treatment only to the few who bear a high risk. The result has been a significant reduction in overtreatment, helping many avoid treatment entirely, with important quality of life impact for hundreds of thousands of men around the world every year. The success of his approach is now influencing treatment standards for other cancers where there are risk differences. In addition to this achievement, Dr Klotz made the important discovery that intermittent androgen suppression can help patients with prostate cancer who show rising PSA levels after radiotherapy. This research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2012, was one of the most successful trials carried out by the NCIC Clinical Trials Group.

Dr Klotz has received numerous accolades, including the Queen’s Jubilee Medal for meritorious public service in 2013 and the Society of Urological Oncology Medal in 2014. Most recently he was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2014 for his leadership in the adoption of the Delayed Selective Intervention standard. The Canadian Cancer Society has benefited from his generosity through years of service on peer review panels. He is recognized as a compelling communicator, generous with his time for academic service and mentorship, and a global ambassador for Canadian surgical oncology.

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