What the 2015 Canadian Cancer Statistics Report means for Nova Scotia

27 May 2015

Halifax -

What the 2015 Canadian Cancer Statistics Report means for Nova Scotia

 

 

Today the Canadian Cancer Society released its annual report — The 2015 Canadian Cancer Statistics Report — in collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada. In addition to updated yearly cancer statistics, this is the first time the annual Canadian Cancer Statistics Report has presented long-term predictions on the future burden of cancer.

 

The report estimates that by 2030, the number of new cases will rise by 40%. This surge in cancer cases is due to a growing and aging Canadian population. Nova Scotia along with Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Quebec and New Brunswick, is expected to experience lower than average growth in the senior population. Consequently, this will contribute to differences in the predicted increase of cancer burden for Nova Scotia.

 

Although the sheer number of cases will increase across the country, the overall risk of getting cancer is not expected to change significantly. This report does, however, gives a clearer idea of the impact an increase in cancer cases will have on healthcare systems, healthcare providers, caregivers and families.

 

“This information will be helpful in the planning of cancer control programs for prevention, screening, early detection, treatment, palliative and other medical care,” says Kelly Cull, Manager of Government and Partner Relations, Canadian Cancer Society- Nova Scotia Division. “Here in Nova Scotia, we have been investing in prevention strategies such as a ban on flavoured tobacco to reduce youth smoking rates. As a result of this, we expect to see rates for smoking related cancers decrease over time here in Nova Scotia. We are also in the process of expanding The Lodge That Gives which will provide more accommodations and services for cancer patients in Nova Scotia.”

 

What does the future trend look like for Canada and our region? Nationally, the most common cancers (prostate, colorectal, lung and breast) are expected to stay the same with a few exceptions — prostate cancer is set to become the most common cancer type overall; in men, colorectal cancer is projected to outrank lung cancer as the 2nd most frequently diagnosed cancer type overall; in women, thyroid cancer is expected to outrank non-Hodgkin lymphoma as the 5th most common cancer in women.

The Atlantic region is projected to have the lowest national rates for breast, uterus, ovarian cancers, and the liver and leukemia in both sexes by 2030.

“As we prepare for a rise in the number of cancer cases, we need to continue to fund research to improve cancer screening, early detection and treatment,” says Dr. Carman Giacomantonio, Associate Professor of Surgery, Surgical Oncologist, Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University. “We all need to do our part to deliver programs and services to prevent cancer and support those living with cancer, their families and caregivers. 

 

 

 

Highlights in Nova Scotia cancer statistics for 2015:

  • It is estimated 6,300 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Nova Scotia
  • Most common cancer diagnosis in Nova Scotia
    • Males: prostate (710), colorectal (510), and lung (480) of 3,300 newly diagnosed cancers
    • Females: breast (780), lung (480), colorectal(410) of 3,000 newly diagnosed cancers
  • The estimated cancer deaths in Nova Scotia is 2,700
    • Males: lung (350) colorectal (200), prostate (130)
    • Females: lung (360), colorectal (160), breast (150)
  • In Nova Scotia the age-standardized incidence rate for breast cancer is the highest in Canada.
  • Nova Scotia has the second highest age-standardized incidence rate of colorectal cancer among both men and women in Canada, next to Newfoundland.
  • Nova Scotia has the highest rates of melanoma amongst Canadian females, Nova Scotia men have the second highest rates next to PEI.
  • Cancer incidence and mortality rates generally increase from west to east across the country.

Projected trends in national cancer statistics for 2030:

  • The most common cancers diagnosed for both sexes will be prostate (42,225), colorectal (35,075), lung (32,365), then breast (31,255)
  • In men, prostate, colorectal, lung and bladder cancers are expected to continue being the four most common cancers. However, colorectal cancer is projected to outrank lung cancer as the second most frequently diagnosed cancer type overall
  • In women, breast, lung, colorectal and uterine cancer are expected to continue to be the 4 most common cancers. However, thyroid cancer is expected to outrank non-Hodgkin lymphoma as the 5th most common cancer in women
  • Lung cancer will increase 46%;
  • Prostate cancer cases will increase 97%. By 2030 this will be the most commonly diagnosed cancer
  • Female breast cancer cases will increase 55%
  • Colorectal cancers will increase 79%

 

Projected trends in Nova Scotia cancer statistics for 2030:

  • General population growth is forecast to be lower than the Canadian average in Atlantic Canada, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and the Territories.

  • Nova Scotia, Manitoba, Quebec, and New Brunswick will experience lower than average growth in the senior population.

  • These combined factors will result in a cancer increase rate which is lower than the Canadian average.

  • The age standardization incidence rates for all cancers combined are projected to be highest for males in the Atlantic region.

  • By 2028-2032, the Atlantic region is projected to have the lowest national rates for breast, uterus, ovarian cancers, and the liver and leukemia in both sexes.

 

 

About Canadian Cancer Statistics

Canadian Cancer Statistics 2015 was prepared through a partnership of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries. For more information about Canadian Cancer Statistics 2015, visit the Canadian Cancer Society’s website at cancer.ca/statistics

 

About the Canadian Cancer Society

The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is to eradicate cancer and enhance the quality of life of people living with cancer. Thanks to our donors and volunteers, the Society has the most impact, against the most cancers, in the most communities in Canada. Building on our progress, we are working with Canadians to change cancer forever. For more information, visit cancer.ca or call our toll-free bilingual Cancer Information Service at 1-888-939-3333 (TTY 1-866-786-3934).

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For more information, contact:

Heather Creighton Spriet

Associate Director, Marketing and Communications

Canadian Cancer Society – Nova Scotia Division

heather.spriet@ns.cancer.ca

902 423-6183