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Canadian Cancer Statistics 2011

18 May 2011

New Brunswick -

A simple at-home test has the potential to prevent many colorectal cancer deaths, according to a special report about colorectal cancer in the Canadian Cancer Statistics 2011, released today by the Canadian Cancer Society in collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada.

According to the 2009 Colon Cancer Screening in Canada survey, 34% of New Brunswickers ages 50 to 74 reported being tested for colorectal cancer in the previous two years, and/or a sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy in the previous five years, well below the benchmark of 80%. The Canadian Cancer Society recommends that people between the ages 50 and 74 who are at average risk of colorectal cancer be screened every two years with a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) and the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). These can detect trace amounts of blood in the stool.

“Screening among the target age group has the potential to prevent many deaths from colorectal cancer,” said Anne McTiernan-Gamble, CEO of the Canadian Cancer Society New Brunswick. “It’s important to note that the goal of screening is to detect cancer in its early stages in people who have no symptoms. Currently, New Brunswick does not have an organized colorectal screening program, but the Provincial Government has announced plans to establish one by 2013.”

“We encourage all people in the target age group to talk to their family physicians about obtaining a screening test,” Ms. McTiernan-Gamble said. “Those who are not within the age range of 50 – 74 but who are experiencing symptoms or are at higher risk for colorectal cancer should speak with their physician.”

Participation in screening for colorectal cancer varies widely across the country, with the lowest rate in Quebec and the highest in Ontario and Manitoba (the first two provinces to actively launch province-wide screening programs).

In Canada, colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death. In New Brunswick, approximately 550 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2011, and an estimated 215 will die from the disease.

Canadian Cancer Statistics 2011 New Brunswick highlights:

  • An estimated 4,800 New Brunswickers will be diagnosed with cancer in 2011, and an estimated 1,990 will die from the disease.
  • The four most common cancers in New Brunswick are prostate, lung, colorectal and breast. These are also the cancers with the highest mortality rates.
  • In both sexes, the age-standardized incidence rate for all cancers combined is higher in New Brunswick compared to the national average. In males, this is mainly due to the higher rate of prostate, lung, bladder, and kidney cancer in the province. In females, this is mainly due to the higher rate of lung, thyroid melanoma, pancreas and kidney cancer in the province.
  • In both sexes, the age-standardized mortality rate for all cancers combined is higher in New Brunswick compared to the national average. In males, this is mainly due to the higher rate of lung and pancreas cancer in the province. In females, this is mainly due to the higher rate of pancreas and kidney cancer in the province.

Canadian Cancer Statistics 2011 is prepared, printed and distributed through a collaboration of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries.

The Canadian Cancer Society is a national community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of the quality of life of people living with cancer. When you want to know more about cancer, visit our website www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free, bilingual Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.